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AIM Satellite Mission Patch

FEATURED DATA

SOFIE PMC Profile 2012

The figure above (from Nielsen et al.) shows how SOFIE PMC detections are collocated with the cold troughs of the 5-day wave, in particular during the later part of the season. The effect of wave activity was demonstrated to extend the PMC season into times when the zonal mean temperature was above the frost point.

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2013 SENIOR REVIEW PROPOSAL

AIM 2013 Extended Mission Proposal

ORBIT TOOLS

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LAUNCH DETAILS


days

since AIM launched.

Launch Date: 25 April 2007
Location: Vandenberg AFB, California, USA
Launch Vehicle: Pegasus
Orbit: Sun-synchronus
Inclination: 97.8 degrees
Period: 96 min, 32 sec

After initial spacecraft stabilization, the spacecraft and instruments underwent extensive commissioning activities to ensure proper operation.

AIM DATA SETS

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MISSION STATUS

10.29.13

The AIM spacecraft continues to perform well.  All subsystems are operational.  The flight operations team has been busy testing the communication between AIM and the newest member of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellites or TDRS.  The team also is preparing to mitigate any impacts to the spacecraft due to the upcoming eclipse of the sun by the moon on November 3rd.

SOFIE data January 2013

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INSTRUMENTS

CDE
CDE Instrument

Final Mass, Power, & Data Rates for SOFIE, CIPS, CDE, BUS, and their totals.

SPACEWEATHER

Spaceweather Photo Gallery

spaceweather

Observing tips: Look west 30 to 60 minutes after sunset when the Sun has dipped 6o to 16o below the horizon. If you see luminous blue-white tendrils spreading across the sky, you've probably spotted a noctilucent cloud. Although noctilucent clouds appear most often at arctic latitudes, they have been sighted in recent years as far south as Colorado, Utah and Virginia. NLCs are seasonal, appearing most often in late spring and summer. In the northern hemisphere, the best time to look would be between mid-May and the end of August. See also 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009


THE MISSION

The Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite mission is exploring Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs), also called noctilucent clouds, to find out why they form and why they are changing.

The AIM mission has been extended by NASA through the end of FY12. During this time the instruments will monitor noctilucent clouds to better understand their variability and possible connection to climate change. Individual instrument data collection status, as well as spacecraft and instrument health, will be monitored throughout the life of the mission and reported periodically on this website.

The primary goal of the AIM mission is to help scientists understand whether the clouds' ephemeral nature, and their variation over time, is related to Earth's changing climate - and to investigate why they form in the first place. By measuring the thermal, chemical and other properties of the environment in which the mysterious clouds form, the AIM mission will provide researchers with a foundation for the study of long-term variations in the mesosphere and its relationship to global climate change. In addition to measuring environmental conditions, the AIM mission will collect data on cloud abundance, how the clouds are distributed, and the size of particles within them.

NEWS & PRESS

06.07.13
Noctilucent Clouds Get an Early Start
NASA Science News

Noctilucent clouds have surprised researchers by appearing early this year. The unexpected apparition of electric-blue night-shining clouds hints at a change in the "teleconnections" of Earth's atmosphere.

FULL STORY: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2013/07jun_nlcs/

VIDEO: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
ohQzHz9gy6c

VIMEO viewing and download video: http://vimeo.com/67889591

12.31.12
www.universetoday.com/99190/most-
awesome-space-images-of-20122/#ixzz2HVKeyy7L


"Astronauts shot an image of delicate shining threads called polar mesospheric clouds as they zoomed across the Tibetan plateau in June 2012. Also known as noctilucent or night-shining clouds, this image is the first time astronauts caught the phenomenon from orbit."

ISS Photo of Noctilucent Clouds 2012
click to view full size image

Press Release Archive

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Last Modified: January 28, 2014

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